Over one million cases of gastrointestinal cancer (or gastric cancer) are diagnosed each year around the world. In order to treat gastrointestinal (GI) cancer most effectively, thorough and accurate testing must be performed. We offer advanced diagnostic techniques to ensure the correct diagnosis for each of our patients.

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FAQs on Gastrointestinal Cancer:

What Is Gastrointestinal Cancer?

Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer simply refers to a group of cancers that affect the gastrointestinal tract and other organs within the digestive system.

What Are The Types of GI Cancer?

  • Esophageal Cancer
  • Appendix Cancer
  • Liver Cancer
  • Stomach Cancer
  • Small Intestine Cancer
  • Gallbladder and Biliary Tract Cancer
  • Pancreatic Cancer
  • Gastro-Intestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST)
  • Neuroendocrine Tumours (NETs)
  • Colorectal Cancer
  • Small Bowel Cancer
  • Colon Cancer

What are the risk factors for GI cancers?

Risk factors for gastrointestinal cancers vary depending on the type cancer, however, general risk factors include:

  • Poor diet
  • Smoking
  • Obesity
  • Physical inactivity
  • Heavy alcohol use
  • Family history of GI cancer
  • Gene mutation (MCC, APC, and p53 tumor suppressor genes)
  • Working in the coal, metal or rubber industries
  • History of type II diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease (IBS), Crohn’s disease, chronic acid reflux, cirrhosis, and chronic viral hepatitis B or C

What are the symptoms of GI cancers?

Symptoms of GI cancers can vary depending on the type of cancer. Some warning signs may include the following:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Change in stool color
  • Blood in the stool
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Fatigue
  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes)
  • Heartburn
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Feeling bloated
  • Trouble swallowing
  • Loss of appetite

How Are Gastrointestinal Cancers Diagnosed?

Are GI Cancers Preventable?

Medical research has led to few insights as to what causes GI cancers and how to prevent them. It may be possible to lower your risk through positive lifestyle changes and getting regular preventative screenings.